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Caldwell Nursery in Rosenburg, Texas
This weekend I left poor Dr. Wife with the kids, and headed out to attend the annual Texas Rare Fruit Growers scion exchange at Caldwell Nursery in Rosenburg, Texas. We are very thankful to Kay Dee for letting us use their facilities again this years, and especially for extending a 10% discount to TXRFG members during the event. There was a pretty good variety of cuttings and scions from local growers, scions sent by chapters of the California Rare Fruit Growers, and many rooted cuttings and rootstocks. I didn't contribute very much this year, just some apple and pear scions, and some miracle fruit seedlings. Terry Matherne brought a seemingly endless supply of his seedling Golden grapefruit and other fruit, and Scott Johnsgard sent hundreds of fig cuttings, seeds, and seedlings trees.

We had a pretty good turnout, and as always, I had a great time hanging out with everyone. I was having such a good time that I forgot that I should have been taking pictures. I didn't bring nearly as many cuttings home this year because until my trees get bigger, I just don't have many more branches I can graft onto! I was lucky enough to snag some Mae and Ambrosia pomegranate wood, which I will add to the Kashmir Blend tree, and some Haichya persimmon wood that I will add to my Hana Fuyu. I also got two of each kind of fig variety that was available. I'll get them all started, and I'm thinking of using them to add a row of fig trees to the squat orchard.


On a separate note, we got our first strawberries this week! The few strawberry plants that survived the summer have really taken off, and have started producing already. The boys were just thrilled. The new strawberry plants are starting to grow more vigorously, and I think that we'll be flush with berries once the weather warms up a little bit more. All the blueberries are in bloom, the neighborhood loquats are coming along well (some are even ripe right now), the apple trees are in bloom, and almost all the citrus trees are starting to push new growth. Spring is so close I can feel its warmth. We just need to get through this next week or so with lows in the high 30's, and no late freezes (fingers crossed).

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Tons of fig cuttings courtesy of Scott Johnsgard.
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Late in the exchange when I remembered I was supposed to be taking pictures.
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Boy #2 enjoying some of Terry Matherne's navel oranges.
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First strawberries of the year!
 


Comments

Jeannette
02/26/2013 20:48

nice size strawberries - what do you do to keep them from being eaten? I was picking them at the slightest red color - now something has taken note of the strawberries growing and they are getting to them before I have a chance.

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Clayton
02/27/2013 05:17

Pets and noisy children help keep thieving critters at bay, but I'm afraid I don't have any specific advice for protecting strawberries other than to plant more than you need, and hope there's enough for everyone.

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Yadda
03/02/2013 14:37

Hi Clayton,

Good to see you again. It loos like most of the black figs I stuck in pots rooted. Let me know if you want one or two.

Regards,
Lyndon

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08/05/2013 02:45

Strawberries are looking great. Own grown food are very healthy

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Randall M. Negrini
09/26/2013 04:45

Hi, Nice pics. I read in the article that you got some scions from California. Is there any chance some avocado scions will show up for 2014? I don't know if you can request particular variety's or not, I am looking for one that naturally stay under twenty feet in height. I am looking for sharwil, also called kona sharwil by some in the trade and any others that have a great flavor and small tree size. Do you know of a source for gold nugget and pixie tangerines tangerines? Thanks

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